Glossary:Anisotropic filtering (AF)

From PCGamingWiki, the wiki about fixing PC games
This page is a stub: it lacks content and/or basic article components. You can help to expand this page by adding an image or additional information.
Example of anisotropic filtering on a runway.
Example of anisotropic filtering on a runway.

For a list of games, see games with anisotropic filtering (AF) support.

Anisotropic Filtering is a type of texture filtering which increases the visual quality of textures at steep angles to the camera, such as those that recede into the distance.

The option to enable Anisotropic Filtering is present is almost every PC game on the market today. Usually you will be able to select texture sample rates of 2x, 4x, 8x, or 16x. The texture sample rate is the number of passes the Anisotropic Filtering algorithm makes on the current textures in the frame. Most newer GPUs can render settings of 8x or 16x AF without a noticeable loss of performance, but if you are experiencing low FPS, lowering the sample rate or disabling the Anisotropic Filtering setting may increase performance.

Force anisotropic filtering[edit]

NVIDIA Control Panel[edit]

  1. Open the NVIDIA Control Panel found in in Windows' Control Panel.
  2. Proceed to the 3D Settings / Manage 3D Settings tab on the left side bar.
  3. Select the game under 'Program to customize'. Alternatively, manually select the executable using the 'Add' button.
  4. Change the 'Anisotropic Filtering' option to the desired level of sharpness.
  5. Apply the changes.

AMD Catalyst Control Center[edit]

  1. Open the AMD Catalyst Control Panel found in Windows' Control Panel.
  2. Proceed to the Image Quality / Anisotropic Filtering tab.
  3. Uncheck the 'Use application settings' box.
  4. Set the option to the desired level of sharpness.
  5. Apply the changes.

External links[edit]

Anisotropic Filtering article on Wikipedia