Glossary:Custom resolution

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Key points

Custom resolutions allow running games at resolutions your monitor can't normally display.
This can be used for downsampling anti-aliasing; it is also useful for making custom 4:3 resolutions for games that stretch from 4:3 with normal widescreen resolutions.
GPU scaling usually must be enabled. It is is also recommended to set Scaling Mode to "Maintain aspect ratio".[citation needed]
In some cases, a custom resolution with a lowered vertical value can be used as a last-ditch effort to trick a game into widening its FoV. This induces letterboxing and can negatively impact the UI. If applicable, a tool such as Widescreen Fixer should be preferred.
Custom resolutions sometimes will disappear with Windows 10 Creators Updates. They can be easily readded after the update. [citation needed]
Use Custom Resolution Utility (EDID method)[citation needed]
  1. Enable GPU scaling and set it to "Maintain aspect ratio".
  2. Download and run the Custom Resolution Utility.
  3. Click the Add button under detailed resolutions.
  4. Change timing to Automatic - LCD Standard.
  5. Fill in the horizontal, vertical and refresh rate boxes (refresh rate is usually 60).
  6. Click OK. Click OK again to close the program.
  7. Run restart64.exe (for 64-bit Windows) or restart.exe (for 32-bit Windows).
  8. Test it by temporarily making it the Windows desktop resolution; if it works there it will work for games.
  9. Some games won't detect the custom resolution so you may need to set it manually in a configuration file.
If the output is skewed or out of range ensure GPU scaling is enabled and set to "Maintain aspect ratio".
This doesn't work for Intel graphics.
AMD/ATI cards[citation needed]
  1. Download and run the Radeon Custom Resolution Manager (RCRM).
  2. Click the + by the aspect ratio you want.
  3. Enter the width you want; height is calculated automatically.
  4. Set the frequency (the default of 60 is usually correct).
  5. Click OK.
  6. Click Save and restart your computer.
  7. Test it by temporarily making it the Windows desktop resolution; if it works there it will work for games.
  8. Some games won't detect the custom resolution so you may need to set it manually in a configuration file.
AMD/ATI 5xxx and newer cards - Crimson drivers[2]
  1. Open %ProgramFiles(x86)%\AMD\CNext\CCCSlim\CCC.exe
  2. Under My Digital Flat-Panels, select Custom Resolutions (Digital Flat-Panel) and accept terms
  3. Click New and adjust resolution details, preferably avoiding Manual Timing Standard and starting to try from CVT-reduced blanking
  4. Confirm everything with Verify and wait for new settings to be tested.
If the output is skewed or out of range ensure GPU scaling is enabled and set to "Maintain aspect ratio".
Doesn't work by default with VGA monitors starting from 16.2 drivers[1][citation needed]
  1. Open the Nvidia control panel.
  2. Enable GPU scaling and set it to "Maintain aspect ratio".
  3. Go to Change Resolutions.
  4. Under Custom resolutions, click Add.
  5. Set the resolution you want (refresh rate will usually be 60).
  6. Click OK and wait for the resolution to be tested. If everything is OK you'll see a prompt. Click OK.
If the output is skewed or out of range ensure GPU scaling is enabled and set to "Maintain aspect ratio".
Intel iGPUs and Nvidia Laptops with Optimus[citation needed]
  1. Open the Intel Control Panel.
  2. Go to Display.
  3. Set Scaling Mode to something other than "Maintain Display Scaling", such as "Maintain Aspect Ratio".
  4. Go to Change Resolutions.
  5. Under Add, set the resolution you want (refresh rate will usually be 60).
  6. Click Yes and wait for the resolution to be tested. If everything is okay, the custom resolution will be added to the Custom Resolution List.
Does not allow resolutions higher than native (ex. 1440p on a 1080p screen).

References