User:ThatOneReaper/Editing guide

From PCGamingWiki, the wiki about fixing PC games
This guide has been finished and officially integrated into the site. All further edits will be made on the official guide sub-section. This page will remain available for archival purposes.
Please use the community thread for discussion on this guide.

Contents

Introduction

A major issue facing PCGamingWiki (and any wiki for that matter) is consistency. Due to the open nature of the site, quality in content can vary wildly with screenshots, step-by-step fixes, table notes, and numerous other elements that make up an article.

The following guide is meant to serve as a constant framework for all edits and article creation on the wiki.

Before continuing

The guide assumes that the reader has already looked at the sample article. It explains all the basics of the tables and provides bare-bones editing guidelines.

General

This section is for editing guidelines that apply for an entire article and the wiki as a whole.

The 6 basic rules of wiki editing

  1. All writing in the wiki should be formal, clearly written, and neutral in nature. Statements on subjective elements without proper referencing should be avoided.
  2. Text should be free of grammar and spelling errors.
  3. Text should always be written in the third person (i.e. never directly reference the reader).
  4. Research the topic thoroughly. Wikipedia and any search engine are the greatest tools available to a contributor.
  5. When in doubt, leave the field blank/unknown.
  6. Ask the moderators for help if needed. They will be happy to assist.

Article Creation and Editing Basics

This sub-section handles all the basics of creating an article and editing it.

Creating a new article

Note that as part of the wiki's anti-spam measures, new accounts must make at least 1 edit to an existing page and wait 2 hours before new articles can be created or upload a new file.
  1. First, type in the name of the article to be created in the search box (for the wiki) and then press Enter.
    Creating Articles Guide Step 1.png
  2. If this article already exists, it will show it or show similarly-titled articles. If not, click the red "Create Article" link.
    Creating Articles Guide Step 2.png
  3. Type in the desired text into the text box and format the article nicely if possible. If not possible, do not worry; just pop onto IRC, and ask a mod for assistance.
    Creating Articles Guide Step 3.png
  4. Type in a Description for it (1).
    Creating Articles Guide Steps 4 and 5.png
  5. Click "Save Page" to save the article (2). To see what it looks like before submitting it, click "Preview".

Wiki markup cheat sheet

Editing a wiki is slightly more complicated than a standard content management system. There is no WYSIWYG ('What you see is what you get') view of the document, and all layout is controlled through 'wiki markup'.

Editing

Simply click on the "Edit Page" tab on the top of the wiki page. A new page with a text box containing the editable text of the current page will be presented. In this box, the desired text can be added in. The toolbar above the text box can help with formatting. It can also auto-generate common sections and elements of an article.

Tips:

  • Never start a line with a leading space unless the special formatting it causes is required. Paragraphs can be separated with a blank line.
  • When editing is finished, a short edit summary should be written up in the small field below the edit-box.
  • To see how the page looks with the proposed changes, press the "Show preview" button.
Minor Edit

A check to the "minor edit" box signifies that only superficial differences exist between the version with the current edit and the previous version: typo corrections, formatting and presentational changes, rearranging of text without modifying content, etc. A minor edit is a version that the editor believes requires no review and could never be the subject of a dispute.

Major Edit

Before engaging in a major edit, it is recommended that the proposed changes be discussed on the article discussion/talk page.

Once the edit has been completed, the inclusion of an edit summary will assist in documenting the changes. These steps will help all to ensure that major edits are well received by the community. A major edit should be reviewed to confirm that it is consensual to all concerned editors. Therefore, any change that affects the meaning of an article is major (not minor), even if the edit is a single word. There are no necessary terms the editor has to agree to when doing major edits, but the recommendations above have become best practice. If done in a style not consistent with the guidelines set out in the Editing Guide, the likelihood of the editor's work being revised will be higher.

When performing a large edit, it is recommended that the edits (before pressing the "save page" button) are periodically copied into an external text editor (preferably one without formatting, such as Notepad). This ensures that in the case of a browser crash, work is not lost. If substantial amounts of work is being added, it is also a good idea to save changes in stages.

Protected Pages

Some pages are protected from editing. These pages have a View source tab instead of an Edit tab. These pages can still be edited indirectly by submitting an "edit request" - an editor with the ability to edit the protected page will respond to the request. A request can be submitted by clicking on the View source tab on that page and using the "Submit an edit request" link at the bottom right.

Article Formatting

Spelling

Spell checking before submitting is a good idea, especially for readers whose first language is not English and may rely on translating articles or for those who use screen-readers. All major browsers and text editors included spell checking functionality built-in.

Common English spelling mistakes

Mistake Explanation
Then / than Then — used in reference to time.

Than — used in comparison.

Neither or There are two combinations: Either... or and Neither... nor!
It's / Its It's = it is

Its = The thing the belongs to it. Same as his or hers.

Their there they're Their = The thing that belongs to them

There = They happened to be there
They're = They are

Who's / Whose Who's = Who is. As in "Who's with me?!"

Whose, as in "I will have to fix the car whose engine I ruined"

Donut / Thru Correct spelling is Doughnut and Through
Aluminum Correct spelling is Aluminium
See also: 10 Words You Need to Stop Misspelling (The Oatmeal)

Grammar and Punctuation

Proper grammar and punctuation will help make text on the wiki far easier to read. It will also help cut down on time spent editing fixes in the future. There are countless guides online for English grammar, but here are some places to start:

Names

Names of both games and operating systems should be written out in full. Not only does this increase clarity, but it allows for wiki articles to be more prevalent in search results. For example, Windows XP should be written out in full, never as WinXP or other variants.

Files and File Paths

All files and file paths should be encased with a <code> </code> or {{code| <text here> }} tag.

Examples (with <code> </code>)

  1. setup.exe
  2. <path-to-game>\Bin\Game.exe

Examples (with {{code| <text here> }})

  1. DedServer.exe
  2. <path-to-game>\System\config.ini

Keyboard keys and shortcuts

To properly display keyboard keys, use the Key tag: {{Key| Key 1 | Key 2 | Key 3}}

For keyboard shortcuts, separate each key with |. The tag supports up to 10 keys in a single combination.

Note that all keyboard keys and shortcuts refer to a QWERTY US keyboard layout. Keys and shortcuts may vary with other layouts.

Examples

  1. A
  2. Alt+ Enter
  3. Ctrl+Alt+Del

Units

All units should be written down correctly for consistency and clarity.

Bad:1ghz
Good: 1 GHz

It is important to note that units follow defined international standards. All numbers require a space before the units. Units written out in full must be all in lower case, not in sentence case and not with numbers.

For a paragraph describing technical details about CPUs, the frequency would be written out as megahertz or gigahertz, not Megahertz and not GigaHertz.

"The "clock rate" of a central processing unit, CPUs, is measured in hertz, typically megahertz and gigahertz. For example, some CPUs have a clock rate of 700 MHz or 4.2 GHz."

Also make sure the correct units are used for sizes! The units for size are: b, bit; B, Byte. The latter is the one that is most likely to be used and it is eight times bigger than the former.

For Frames per second (FPS), they are provided as whole numbers. If a number is a decimal, round up to the nearest whole value (ex. 60.57 FPS becomes 61 FPS).

Further reading

Linking

Formal documentation on wiki-style hyperlinks can be found on Wikipedia

Hyperlinks are used to link to external sites. Depending on the type of link, different linking styles would be required. The table below covers all the major styles used:

Hyperlink style table
Link type Syntax Example URL Link example Example source
Regular link [<url> <hyperlink text>] http://www.gog.com/ GOG.com [http://www.gog.com/ GOG.com]
Internal link (to another wiki article) [[<article name>]] http://pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/Half-Life
(Refer to page title for proper text)
Half-Life [[Half-Life]]
Internal link (to another section in current article) [[#<section title>|<hyperlink text>]] http://pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/User:ThatOneReaper/Editing_guide#Other_Wikis_and_Resources
(Refer to section title for proper text)
Further details about wikis [[#Other Wikis and Resources|Further details about wikis]]
Wikipedia link {{W|<page title>}}
or
[[Wikipedia:<page title>|<hyperlink text>]]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCGamingWiki PCGamingWiki
or
A link to PCGamingWiki
{{W|PCGamingWiki}}
or
[[Wikipedia:PCGamingWiki|A link to PCGamingWiki]]
Source

It is preferred that links given are to actual pages, rather than direct download links.

Ex. If there is a mod of a certain game, link to the information page of the mod, such as a forum thread or a code repository site (like Github), instead of a direct download link. Direct download links might contain malicious files and as such should not be linked to on this wiki.

When creating a link, try to provide some context. Never simply link text as only 'Source' or 'here', try to say 'Comment from Rock Paper Shotgun'.

As a side note, any link pointing towards the PCGamingWiki Files database should never be superseded without good reason. If a file is out of date, non-functional, or malware-infected, please contact a mod via PM or the wiki's IRC channel.

Other Wikis and Resources

It is encouraged by the wiki to link to other regularly updated sources of information. For example, Wide Screen Gaming Forum or DOSBoxWiki. Including huge amounts of duplicate information should be avoided. However, there are many cases where the wiki can add more information about a title. For example, what are the differences between a GOG and a DOSBox version of a game?

Referencing

Proper references are critical for any wiki worth its salt. They provide credibility to any claims made in an article. They also help reinforce the wiki's reputation as a source of reliable fixes.

General guidelines

  • Anything that is subjective in nature or can be debated by someone else should be referenced.
    • Ex. Statements on feature state, release dates, etc.
  • The wiki does not require formal academic style references. A link to the relevant article is good enough.
  • Sources used must come from credible sources.
    • Credible sources are considered major gaming sites (ex. IGN), any mainstream news organizations, developer/publisher-run sites, "notable" YouTube series/personality (ex. TotalBiscut), and digital distribution sites.
    • Wikipedia is also considered "credible", but should be cross-referenced with another source as a precautionary measure.
  • Sources by other sites (content aggregators, forums, blogs, etc.) must have at least one other source with the same statement.
    • The only exception to this is if the sourced post is by a developer team member or representative (and their identity has been verified).
  • All sources must be up to date.
    • Should a source go down permanently or for an extended period (>2 months), the source must be replaced with an equivalent.
    • If there are no alternatives, use the latest archived version of the original source (see The Wayback Machine).
  • If a statement or claim needs to be verified and there are no references available, add the Citation Needed tag ( {{cn}} ) to the end of the sentence.
    • Ex. This is a great example![citation needed]

Reference Citation tag

Syntax

<ref>(url or hyperlink)</ref>

Example
PCGamingWiki was founded on February 9, 2012.[1]

The Reference Citation tag is the primary method of citing a reference. It is to be used in conjunction with the References tag (the page will produce an error otherwise).

Note that organization of the references is automatically handled via the References tag.

General rules

  • If a citation is used at the end of a sentence, place it after the period/exclamation mark/question mark.
  • If multiple sentences refer to the same reference, place the citation at the end of the last sentence.
  • Naming reference links should follow this layout: <SITE/FORUM NAME> - <ARTICLE/THREAD TITLE>

Screenshots

An often overlooked aspect of an article, screenshots provide a visual reference for tables and fixes.

Tools

There are countless utilities and programs that provide screen capturing/recording. Which one to use is a matter of preference, but here is a list of the major ones:

  • Built-in: Most modern OSes come with rudimentary screen capture utilities or functions built-in. Compared to 3rd party solutions, they are for the most part barebones.
    • Windows: Alt+Prt Scr & Windows Paint combo, Snipping Tool
      • Alt+Prt Scr captures the active window only. For the whole screen, use Prt Scr.
    • OS X: Grab
    • Linux: (Varies between distributions)
  • Game clients: Most game client software (ex. Steam) include screen capture functionality as part of their in-game overlays. Again, compared to 3rd party programs, the functionality is barebones.
  • 3rd party: Standalone utilities and applications that provide screen capturing/recording. Has the most functionality and customization available, but also the most complicated.

Format

There are two ways to insert screenshots into an article: as an embedded file, or as part of a gallery.

Embedded file

Syntax

{{Image|File name|Caption}}

Example

In-game general video settings.
In-game general video settings.

The main method of displaying images on a page. They are normally placed at the top of the relevant section.

Embedded file section breakdown

Section Definition Notes
File name The name of the image file. The file extension must be included.
Caption A sentence or two to identify and describe the image. See Caption layout.
Gallery

Syntax (base)

<gallery>
--rows go here--
</gallery>

Syntax (row)

File:File name|Caption

Example

Another method available, reserved mainly for multiple images in a section that would take up too much space as embedded files. They are normally placed at the bottom of the main table for the relevant section.

For the rows, only two sections are present: File name and Caption. Both act in the same manner as the ones included with the embedded files.

Caption layout

The captions for all screenshots of option menus (regardless of format) should follow this model:

<Menu location> <menu specifier (if applicable)> <Name of menu> settings <numbering (if part of series)>.

General rules

  • There are 3 types of menu locations:
    1. In-game: The menu is found while running the game.
    2. External: The menu is found as part of an external settings program.
    3. Launcher: The menu is found as part of a game launcher program that must be viewed before starting the game.
  • There are 2 types of menu specifiers:
    1. General
    2. Advanced
  • If a menu cannot be completely captured in one screenshot and stitching them together is not an option, upload the screenshots of the menu as a "series". Add a number to each screenshot to distinguish the ordering.
    • "(current #/total #)"

Guidelines

An example of a proper in-game screenshot.
An example of a proper in-game screenshot.
An example of a proper external/launcher screenshot. Note the colour scheme.
An example of a proper external/launcher screenshot. Note the colour scheme.
This section is for visual guidelines. For guidelines relating to technical aspects of screenshots, see PCGamingWiki:Files
  • Screenshots should be taken at the native resolution of the monitor.
    • For older games that do not support widescreen, set it to the highest possible resolution the monitor can handle (or the game can natively support, whichever comes first).
  • Screenshots should show only what the game natively supports. Avoid screenshots of the game with unofficial patches or mods.
  • A screenshot should show all the possible options available in that menu.
    • If that is not possible (ex. menu is a scrollable list), take multiple screenshots of all the possible options and stitch them together. Some image viewers/editors come with automated functions to do such that (ex. "Create panorama image")
  • The look of the UI should be consistent with other related screenshots.
    • Ex. If a game is available on both Windows and Linux, all screenshots should be taken from either the Windows or Linux version but not both.
    • Ex. 2: If a game supports both keyboard/mouse and gamepads, all screenshots should be taken with keyboard/mouse prompts visible or gamepad prompts visible but not both.
  • The cursor should not be visible in the screenshots.
    • The cursor can be hidden at the bottom-right corner of the screen.
    • If the cursor cannot be hidden completely, move it as far off to the corner as possible.
  • For games that have profile systems and the name is visible, use "PCGamingWiki" as the profile name.
    • If the system does not support names of such length, alternatives are "PCGameWiki", "PCGWiki", and "PCGW".
  • For screenshots of external launchers or options menus, the window border should be visible.
    • The window must be also active (i.e. the border is not greyed out).
    • Most screen capture utilities allow for the active window to be captured without the background being included.
    • On Windows, pressing Alt+Prt Scr will capture the active window only.
    • If using Windows 8/8.1, the window border needs to be light blue (labeled as "Color 12" under the Color and Appearance menu in the Control Panel). This allows the screenshot to match the colour scheme of the wiki, while maintaining high contrast with text. See the screenshot on the right for an example.
  • If a screenshot of an external launcher or options menu must include the desktop background (either partially or fully) due to the window styling, set the desktop background to white beforehand.
    • All major OSes natively support setting the background to a solid colour via the Control Panel.
    • Also make sure that no desktop icons are visible in the screenshot.
  • For menus dealing with video settings, max out all the options (or to the limit of the system, whichever comes first) before taking a screenshot.
    • This especially needs to be done for games with active menu backgrounds rendered in real time.
  • All text in screenshots should preferably be in English.

What are valid screenshots?

  • Options menus (external and in-game, as long as they are not junctions for other menus)
  • Error messages
  • Any application screenshot (only if directly related to a fix)
  • Gameplay screenshots (only for comparing video settings like Field of View)

What are invalid screenshots?

  • Title screens
  • Options menu junctions (menu has no modifiable options, only links to other menus)
  • Any screenshot with a personal watermark
  • Any screenshot with applications in view that are not directly related to a fix
  • Any screenshot with offensive imagery (and is not part of the game)
  • Any screenshot that is not original (i.e. taken from another site or person)

Fixboxes and providing instructions

The main focus of this wiki is providing a centralized hub for PC game fixes. However, if the fixes provided are not explained in a clean and easy to follow process, then they are useless. Ultimately, this defeats the purpose of this wiki.

This section handles two critical aspects of providing fixes: the Fixbox, and how to give instructions "properly".

The Fixbox

Syntax

{{Fixbox|1=
{{Fixbox/fix|Name|ref=<ref>Reference</ref>}}
--instructions go here--
}}

Example

Taken from Full Spectrum Warrior
Modifying the FSW.dll file[2]
Before editing, make a backup of the FSW.dll file in case the modifications go wrong.
  1. Go to <path-to-game>.
  2. Open the FSW.dll file with Notepad or other text editor.
  3. Using the Find function (Ctrl+F), search for "%s.available.gamespy.com". There will be exactly one entry.
  4. Replace the text with "www.example.com/fixes/%s" (or any other working link that is the same length as the original and contains "%s" somewhere. This particular link is guaranteed to work.)
  5. Save the file.
  6. Launch the game.

The Fixbox is a specialized container used exclusively for fixes, workarounds, and step-by-step instructions. It provides a formal base for them, as well as keeping the wiki clean.

General rules

  • The title need to summarize what the fix/workaround is trying to accomplish.
    • See above example.
  • For sequenced instructions, use # to label each step.
    • # allows numbered lists to be dynamic.
    • Ex. If new entries are placed in the middle of a list, the old entries are automatically re-numbered.

Providing instructions

Due to the countless variability with games and potential workarounds, it is impossible to come up with rules for every single scenario. For the most part, the contributor will need to use their discretion to write clearly communicated instructions.

That being said, there are some base guidelines that can be applied to almost all fixes:

  • It can be safely assumed that the target audience for the fix can operate a computer at a basic level.
    • i.e. Can use an internet browser, can navigate the OS's file system, knows basic keyboard shortcuts like Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V, etc.
  • Do NOT ever assume that the reader can "figure out the rest". Provide a full set of instructions for the fix, up until the game is fixed completely and can be played.
  • Use relative path locations. Not every user will have C:\ as the drive letter.
  • If a fix requires a particular class of program (ex. hex editors), choose a program, provide a download link for it, and write up the instructions in the context of that particular program.
    • If possible, use programs that are available for free. Fixes are useless if locked behind a paywall.
  • If a fix requires major configuration file modifications (>10 changed lines), create a config file with the changes included and provide a download link.
    • Config file text dumps will be removed.
  • Instructions should gently ease the reader into each step. Everything should be a natural progression of events.

Good example

The Fixbox example from the previous section is also a good case study of clear instructions
  1. Download <File X.zip>.
  2. Go to <file location>.
  3. Rename <File Y> to <File Z>.
  4. Extract the contents of the downloaded file into this folder.
  5. Once extracted, open <File Y-2> with <program name> or other <program type>.
  6. Change the values of <Line 1> and <Line 2> to true.
  7. Save the changes and launch the game.

Common fix templates

While each game has their own fixes and instructions, many of them share universal techniques that can be reused.

Applying compatibility settings (Windows only)
The order of options should remain the same, regardless of what gets removed
Enable the following compatibility settings: Compatibility mode (<OS name here>), Run in 256 colors (XP/Vista/7), Reduced color mode (<specify mode here>) (8/8.1), Run in 640x480 screen resolution, Disable visual themes (XP/Vista/7), Disable desktop composition (XP/Vista/7), Disable display scaling on high DPI settings, and Run this program as an administrator
Using a command line argument
Use the (Insert command here) command line argument
Using a in-game console command
Use (Insert command here) in the in-game console (<Insert console key here, usually ~>)
Installing a program
Download and install [<program site URL here> <program name here>])
Adding a file(s)
<Use one: Add in/Replace/Update> the (full file or folder name here) file/folder[3]
Before continuing, make a backup of the <full file or folder name here>
  1. Download the [<file/folder download URL here> <Use one: file/updated file(s)/patched file(s)>].
  2. Extract the contents of the download to (path location here). <For compressed downloads>
  3. Move the file/folder to (path location here). <For uncompressed downloads>
Modifying a file
Modify (full file name here)[4]
  1. Go to (file path location here).
  2. Open the (full file name here) file with <program name> or other <program type>.
  3. <Instructions on what lines to change go here>
  4. Save the file and launch the game.

What the wiki does not cover

Although the wiki's main goal is to be the go-to source for all PC games, there are some types of games and game-related information it refuses to carry:

  • Information for "alternative" systems (i.e. any OS not currently covered by the wiki).
    • Examples of such OSes are AmigaOS and OS/2.
  • Information for pirated or cracked versions of games.
  • Games only available through crowdfunding sites (ex. Kickstarter).
    • Once the game can be bought through a store such as Steam or Amazon, this restriction will no longer apply.
  • Internet browser-only games.
    • Linking to browser versions of retail games is OK.
  • Pornographic games.
  • Games blatantly promoting or encouraging hate against a group of individuals or race.

Due to the rather subjective nature of the definitions, it is up to the editor to use common sense to determine if a game falls under any of the above categories.

If there is confusion in determining the validity of a new article, contact a mod or admin (either through PM or the wiki's IRC channel).

Piracy

While PC games are our specialty, pirated versions of them are not. Please do not add in links or information specific to pirated or cracked copies of a game. They will be removed otherwise.

If a pirated game is experiencing a problem, in most cases the best fix available is buying the game through a legitimate channel.

Game Article Breakdown

This section focuses on editing guidelines for a typical game article, with a complete breakdown of all the parts that make it up.

Section Table legend

Sections with tables all use a unified rating system for feature support. There are 5 in total:

Article state tags

Article state tags are special notices that declare the state of the page. Always placed at the absolute top of an article (before the Infobox), they also allow the wiki to keep track of pages that are incomplete and/or do not match the standards in this guide.

There are 3 main tags available.

Stub tag

Template documentation

Syntax

{{stub}}

Example

This page is a stub: it lacks content and/or basic article components. You can help to expand this page by adding an image or additional information.

The stub tag is for pages that do not meet minimum requirements for a "proper" article. This can include tables with no data, no screenshots present, and missing article elements/tables.

The tag should only be removed once all the required tables and screenshots are added/filled in.

Cleanup tag

Template documentation

Syntax

{{cleanup|Description of specific issues}}

Example

This page may require cleanup to meet basic quality standards. The specific problem is: None. This is a test of the cleanup tag. You can help by modifying the article. The discussion page may contain useful suggestions.

The cleanup tag is for articles that have issues with content formatting or outdated content. Any articles that do not match the standards in this guide fall under this label.

The tag should only be removed once the offending article element(s) are made to match the wiki's standards.

State tag

Template documentation

Syntax

{{State|state=prototype/predev/pre-alpha/alpha/beta/postdev}}

The state tag is a multi-use label that states the current condition of the game the article is covering.

Note that the tag should only be removed once the tag is no longer relevant to the game (i.e. game is fully released, not under active development). The tag should also be updated when the state of the game has changed (ex. game has moved from Alpha to Beta).

There are 6 sub-tags available:

Prototype tag

Dev general icon.svg
This article documents a game prototype - information may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

Predev tag

Dev general icon.svg
This article documents a game currently under development - information may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

Pre-alpha tag

Dev general icon.svg
This article documents a game currently in a pre-alpha state - information may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

Alpha tag

This game is currently undergoing alpha testing and development - information here may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

Beta tag

This game is currently undergoing beta testing and development - information here may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

Postdev tag

Dev general icon.svg
Although this game has been released, it remains under active development - information may change frequently and could be outdated or irrelevant.

The Infobox

An infobox is the first element of an article. It provides basic information on a game (ex. release dates, developers, publishers, etc.), along with the box art/logo and links to major databases with relevant info (currently Wikipedia, SteamDB, Co-Optimus and WineHQ).

There are two main types of infoboxes (and two niche types) available.

Game infobox

Template documentation

Syntax (main)

{{Infobox game
|title        = 
|cover        = 
|developers   = 
<Developer field rows go here>
|publishers   = 
<Publisher field rows go here>
|engines      = 
<Engine field rows go here>
|release dates= 
<Release date field rows go here>
|steam appid  = 
|steam appid side = 
|gogcom page  = 
|wikipedia    = 
|winehq       = 
}}

Syntax (developer field row, normal)

This is the normal format used for the Developer field row.
{{Infobox game/row/developer|<DEVELOPER NAME>|<OPTIONAL DESCRIPTOR>}}

Syntax (developer field row, porters)

These formats are for developers that are responsible for porting the game to a specific OS.
winporter is for Windows, osxporter is for OS X, and linporter is for Linux
{{Infobox game/row/winporter|<DEVELOPER NAME>}}
{{Infobox game/row/osxporter|<DEVELOPER NAME>}}
{{Infobox game/row/linporter|<DEVELOPER NAME>}}

Syntax (publisher field row)

{{Infobox game/row/publisher|<PUBLISHER NAME>|<OPTIONAL DESCRIPTOR>}}

Syntax (engine field row)

{{Infobox game/row/engine|<ENGINE NAME>|<OPTIONAL DESCRIPTOR>}}

Syntax (release date field row)

The <OS NAME> section will only accept the following values: DOS, Windows, Mac OS, OS X, and Linux
{{Infobox game/row/date|<OS NAME>|<DATE>}}
Example of a game infobox
Example of a game infobox cover
Developers
Developer
Windows Developer 2
macOS (OS X) Developer 3
Linux Developer 4
Publishers
Publisher
Europe Publisher 2
Engines
Engine
Release dates
DOS June 12, 1996
Mac OS (Classic) July 4, 1998
Windows January 3, 2012
macOS (OS X) March 21, 2013
Linux Early access
ThatOneReaper/Editing guide at Wikipedia

The most common infobox available, it is mainly used for game articles.

General rules

  • For release dates, list the earliest platform release first (ex. if the game was released on OS X first, list the OS X release date at the top)
    • In the case that multiple releases share the same date, organize the dates in the following order (for all the platforms that apply):
      • DOS
      • Windows
      • Mac OS
      • OS X
      • Linux
    • For games in Early Access, use EA as the date. Only replace the date when the game has officially left Early Access.

Field breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Title The name of the game. An optional field, it is automatically set to the page name if left blank. It is only required for games with "optional" title modifiers (see SimFarm). Otherwise, it should be left alone.
Cover The cover/logo of the game. The full name of the image file (including extensions) must be provided. See The Cover subsection for details.
Developers The name(s) of the game developer(s). List all the developers involved in the PC releases of the game. The main developer should always be listed first, regardless of involvement.
Publishers The name(s) of the game publisher(s). List all the publishers involved in the PC releases of the game. The main publisher should always be listed first, regardless of involvement. If the publisher is the same as the developer, leave the field blank.
Engines The name(s) of the game engine(s) used. Leave the section empty if the engine used is unnamed or in-house. Do not list game engine middleware (ex. Havok Physics) under the Engines section. See the Middleware table for details.
Release Dates The earliest public release date of the game. All dates are to be written down in the following format: mm dd, yyyy (where mm is the full name of the month). See the General rules section above for further details.
Steam AppID The Steam ID associated with the game. See Database IDs for details.
Steam AppID side The Steam ID associated with the game's DLC. Use commas , to separate multiple Steam IDs. See Database IDs for details.
GOG.com page The GOG.com ID associated with the game. See Database IDs for details.
Wikipedia A link to the game's Wikipedia page (if one exists). See Database IDs for details.
WineHQ A link to the game's WineHQ page (if one exists). The field is meant for games that do not have a native Linux version available. Leave it blank otherwise. See Database IDs for details.
Database IDs

This is a list of the database ID formats for all the databases the infobox supports

Database(s) Example URL What to provide
gogcom page http://www.gog.com/game/system_shock_2 system_shock_2
steam appid (Steam DB, Co-Optimus, Steam game association for external database use) http://store.steampowered.com/app/2310/ 2310
steam appid side (Steam DLC association for external database use) http://store.steampowered.com/app/9040/ 9040
wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quake_(video_game) Quake_(video_game)
winehq https://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=application&iId=930 930

Non-game infobox

Template documentation

Syntax

{{infobox non-game
|title          =
|cover          = 
|developer      = 
|publisher      = 
|release dates  = 
}}
July 22, 2002
Example of a non-game infobox
Example of a non-game infobox cover
Release dates

A less commonly used infobox, it is meant for general software that is related to games in some manner (ex. DOSBox).

Note that it is far more sparse then the game infobox in terms of information provided to the reader. No specialized row templates are used for this infobox.

Field breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Title The name of the program. An optional field, it is automatically set to the page name if left blank. It should be left alone in most cases.
Cover The logo of the program. The full name of the image file (including extensions) must be provided. See The Cover subsection for details.
Developer The name of the program developer.
Publisher The name of the program publisher. If the publisher is the same as the developer, leave the field blank.
Release Dates The earliest public release date of the program. All dates are to be written down in the following format: mm dd, yyyy (where mm is the full name of the month).

Controller infobox

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Infobox controller
|title        = 
|cover        = 
|xinput       = 
|predecessor  = 
|successor    = 
|wikipedia    = 
}}
Example of a controller infobox
Xbox-360-Controller-Black.png
XInput support
Predecessor
Successor
 ThatOneReaper/Editing guide at Wikipedia

A niche infobox, it is meant for game controllers. A game controller can be:

  • Gamepads
  • Joysticks
  • Steering wheels/racing controllers
  • Flight controllers
  • Haptic-centric controllers
  • Motion-based controllers
  • "Exotic" controllers (gaming keypads, dance pads, anything that does not fit in the above categories)

Note that it is far more sparse then the game infobox in terms of information provided to the reader.

Field breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Title The name of the controller. An optional field, it is automatically set to the page name if left blank. It should be left alone in most cases.
Cover A picture of the controller. The full name of the image file (including extensions) must be provided. See The Cover subsection for details.
XInput Support for the XInput controller API. Use true, false, or hackable to denote support level (see Section Table legend for details). A majority of the controllers released past December 2005 (particularly ones that are Xbox 360 and/or Xbox One-focused) have native support. Earlier than that, it should be assumed that the controller is using DirectInput.
Predecessor The controller that was released prior to the current one (if the controllers are part of a series). Linking needs to be done in the following fashion:
[[Controller:<CONTROLLER NAME>|<CONTROLLER NAME>]]

Leave blank if there is no prior release.

Successor The controller that was released after to the current one (if the controllers are part of a series). Linking needs to be done in the following fashion:

[[Controller:<CONTROLLER NAME>|<CONTROLLER NAME>]]
Leave blank if there is no succeeding release.

Wikipedia A link to the controller's Wikipedia page (if one exists). See Database IDs for details.

Console infobox

Template documentation

Syntax (main)

{{Infobox console
|title        = 
|cover        = 
|related      = 
<Related field rows go here>
|predecessor  = 
|successor    = 
|wikipedia    = 
}}

Syntax (Related field row)

{{Infobox console/row/controller|cont=[[Controller:<CONTROLLER NAME>|<CONTROLLER NAME>]]}}
Example of a console infobox
Xbox 360 logo.svg
Related controllers
Predecessor
Successor
 ThatOneReaper/Editing guide at Wikipedia

A niche infobox, it is meant for game consoles.

Note that it is far more sparse then the game infobox in terms of information provided to the reader.

Field breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Title The name of the console. An optional field, it is automatically set to the page name if left blank. It should be left alone in most cases.
Cover The logo of the console. The full name of the image file (including extensions) must be provided. See The Cover subsection for details.
Related A list of controllers that are related directly towards the console. A specialized row template is used to add entries (see the "Related field row" syntax). All entries are to be placed directly below the related field.
Predecessor The console that was released prior to the current one (if the controllers are part of a series). Linking needs to be done in the following fashion:
[[Emulation:<CONSOLE NAME>|<CONSOLE NAME>]]

Leave blank if there is no prior release.

Successor The console that was released after to the current one (if the consoles are part of a series). Linking needs to be done in the following fashion:
[[Emulation:<CONSOLE NAME>|<CONSOLE NAME>]]

Leave blank if there is no succeeding release.

Wikipedia A link to the console's Wikipedia page (if one exists). See Database IDs for details.

The Cover

Used in both types of infoboxes, the cover (or box art) is the focal point of the template.

Valid covers
These are considered acceptable to use
  • Retail box art (scanned)
  • Logos
  • Steam banners
Invalid covers
These sources should be avoided if possible
  • Retail box art (photo)
  • In-game title screens
  • Fan-made box art/logos
Where to find them

There are multiple sources to find a good cover (listed in order of preference)

  • High quality personal/3rd party box art scans (best case)
  • Wikipedia (low quality, but reliable)
  • Other wikis (could possibly have high quality scans, but unreliable)
  • Steam game pages (every game on Steam comes with a banner/logo to use. Low quality, but very reliable)
  • Official/developer website (most likely logos and banners only)
  • MobyGames (very high quality scans, but comes with watermarks. Use as a last resort only)

The Series Sidebar

Should only be used with a collection of games part of an overall series or franchise

The Series Sidebar serves as an extension of sorts for the Infobox. It gives a list of all the games in a particular series and points out where the current article resides in that list. Code-wise, it is always located directly beneath the Infobox and above Key points/General information.

The sidebar is made up of two parts:

The tag

Syntax

{{Series|Game}}

Example

Halo
Halo: Combat Evolved 2003
Halo 2 2007
Halo: Spartan Assault 2013
Halo Online 2015*
Halo: Spartan Strike 2015
Halo 5: Forge 2016
Halo Wars: Definitive Edition 2016
Halo Wars 2 2017
Halo Recruit 2017
Halo: The Master Chief Collection 2019
Halo Infinite TBA

The tag is the portion that is written to articles. It acts as a proxy for the actual table (located in a dedicated Series: page).

In most cases, the actual table is already created and only the tag needs to be added. That being said, there will be times where a new series needs to be added in with no prior entry available. See below for details.

The table

The following is to used on a separate page using the Series: prefix. Creating a Series: page is the same process as creating a game article

Syntax

{{Seriesbox|title=Game|entries=
{{Seriesbox/row|[[The Game]]|2000}}
{{Seriesbox/row|[[Game 2: Electric Boogaloo]]|2004}}
{{Seriesbox/row|[[Game 3: Not Game 2]]|2014}}
}}<noinclude>[[Category:Series]]</noinclude>

Example

See Series:Game

The table is where the actual information is stored. It consists of 2 main parts:

  • The header. Besides holding the table together, the title of the sidebar resides here.
{{Seriesbox|title=Game|entries=
(content goes here)
}}<noinclude>[[Category:Series]]</noinclude>
  • Main game row. A row meant for full game releases in the series.
{{Seriesbox/row|[[The Game]]|2000}}

General rules

  • Games should be ordered on first PC release date (oldest to newest).
  • If an expansion is standalone (i.e. does not require the base game to function), it should be considered a separate game and listed as a full title.
  • Use the full title of the game when adding it to the list.
  • Some franchises are too large to fit onto one table (ex. Star Wars). Narrow in on what sub-series a collection of games follow.
  • A new game in a series should only be added in if it has been confirmed that it will be released on the PC (either Windows, OS X, or Linux).
  • While not common, fan games and major mods for a series can be added in if it is worth mentioning. Ask a mod before editing it in.

The Disambiguation (Disambig) tag

Template documentation
Use the tag only when needed. It can be omitted from an article otherwise.

Syntax

{{Disambig|<CURRENT PAGE DESCRIPTOR>|<FIRST LINK DESCRIPTOR>|<FIRST GAME PAGE LINK>|<SECOND LINK DESCRIPTOR>|<SECOND GAME PAGE LINK>}}

Example

Taken from Tomb Raider

This page is for the original game. For the 2007 remake, see Tomb Raider: Anniversary. For the 2013 reboot, see Tomb Raider (2013).

The Disambiguation (or Disambig) tag is to provide clarification between multiple games. It is used primarily to distinguish games using the same title (original game vs. series reboot) and to distinguish original titles from their remakes. The tag can support a single descriptor for the current page, along with up to 4 separate game pairs (a link descriptor and the actual link).

The tag is to be placed directly underneath the Series Sidebar tag. If the game does not have a series sidebar, place the tag directly underneath the Infobox.

Key points and General information

Key points and General information serve as the buffer between the Infobox/Series sidebar and the rest of the article. They provide critical information related to the game and its community.

Key points

Explanation on the type of bullet points can be found in the Sample Article

Syntax

'''Key points'''
{{ii}} Information
{{++}} Positive point
{{--}} Negative point

Example

Key points

Information
Positive point
Negative point

Key points summarize important information regarding a game. What is considered important varies from game to game, but there are some general rules to follow:

  • Key points are reserved for very important points. Each article should have at most 5 points.
  • The points provided should be information that regards major issues with the game (compatibility issues, critical bugs/crashes, non-functioning multiplayer, etc.), invasive DRM, availability enhancements/limitations, and any possible benefits (free game, open source, community activity, etc.)
  • As mentioned earlier, any point that could be considered subjective must have a reputable reference.

General information

Syntax

Taken (mostly) from Terraria
'''General information'''
{{ii}} [http://community.pcgamingwiki.com/page/blog/_/features/port-reports/pc-report-wolfenstein-the-new-order-r141 PC Report]
{{mm}} [http://www.terraria.org/ Official website]
{{mm}} [http://www.terrariaonline.com/forums/ Official forums]
{{mm}} [http://www.terraria.org/issues.html List of Issues] - Provided by the Terraria developers
{{mm}} [http://terraria.gamepedia.com/Terraria_Wiki Official Wiki]
{{GOG.com links|terraria|terraria}}
{{mm}} [http://steamcommunity.com/app/105600/discussions/ Steam Community Discussions] 
{{mm}} [http://forums.steampowered.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=1132 Steam Users' Forums]

Example

General information

PC Report
Official website
Official forums
List of Issues - Provided by the Terraria developers
Official Wiki
GOG.com Community Discussions
GOG.com Support Page
Steam Community Discussions
Steam Users' Forums

General information is a list of general links that are relevant to the game.

General rules

  • While not as strict as Key points, too many links can create unneeded clutter. Each article should have 10 general links max.
  • If a PC Report or other article by PCGamingWiki is available, provide a link to it at the top of the list.
  • Some potential sites to use:
    • Official websites by the developer
    • Official forums
    • Any thread of general game-specific data
    • Game wikis (official or community)
    • Fan sites
    • GOG.com links (required if available on GOG.com)
    • Steam links (required if available on Steam)
  • The list formatting should be the following:
    • PCGamingWiki articles
    • Official websites (game site, developer-run forums, official wikis)
    • Other official websites
    • Community wikis
    • General community links (fan sites, databases, etc.)
    • GOG.com links tag
    • Steam Community Discussions
    • Steam Users' Forums
    • Source code links (if available)
  • If nothing else can be found, provide a link to the relevant MobyGames article
GOG.com links tag

Syntax

{{GOG.com links| Support page ID | Forums ID | Note for forums link }}

Example

For Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time
GOG.com Community Discussions for game series
GOG.com Support Page

A simplified method of providing links to GOG.com pages. With the appropriate page IDs, the tag can auto-link to the game-specific support page and forums.

Full Example

How it should look:

Key points

Information
Positive point
Negative point

General information

Official website
Official forums
List of Issues - Provided by the Terraria Developers
Official Wiki
GOG.com Community Discussions
GOG.com Support Page
Steam Community Discussions
Steam Users' Forums

Availability

The Availability section deals with all the different purchasing options available for a game. It also provides DRM details, version differences, expansion/DLC info, and links to demos (if provided).

Main table

Template documentation

Syntax (base)

{{Availability|
--rows go here--
}}

Syntax (row, normal)

This is the normal format used for the Availability row.
{{Availability/row| Name of source | product ID | required DRM | notes | keys (if any)}}

Syntax (row, special cases)

This format is for stores that cannot be linked normally due to special URL formatting. It should not be used in any other case.
{{Availability/row|1=Name of source |2=store URL |3=required DRM |4=notes |5=keys (if any)}}

Example

Taken from Mass Effect
Source DRM Notes Keys OS
Retail
Requires online activation
DRM: SecuROM, three machine limit.[5] A De-Authorization Tool is available.
Icon overlay.png
Windows
Origin
Icon overlay.png
Windows
Steam
Icon overlay.png
Steam gives product key which can be activated on Origin
Icon overlay.png
Windows

The main part of the section. The varied nature of availability for each game means that the table cannot be static. As such, each store is sectioned off into its own row (with a base template encapsulating everything). This allows the table to save space by showing only the relevant purchasing options.

Availability row breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Source name The name of the source/store. Only major and trustworthy stores are allowed to be used. A full list of all the options can be found in the template documentation.
Product ID The unique ID/URL given by the store to the game. What to place here varies from store to store. See The Product ID for a list of accepted values.
DRM used The Digital Rights Management (DRM) methods employed by the game. Games using a digital distribution service (ex. Steam) will have that service act as the DRM. Separate each method with a comma (,). See Template:ID for a list of valid values.
Notes Extra information relating to the particular store (game version provided, unique quirks and issues, etc.)
Keys Any extra keys provided by the store that can be redeemed by another distribution service. Retail serial keys that can be redeemed on a digital distribution service also count.
The Product ID

This is a list of the product ID formats for all the stores an availability row can accept.

Store(s) Example URL What to provide
Retail N/A Nothing. The Retail store option is just to state that a retail version was available at some point.
Developer N/A The full URL of the store.
Publisher N/A The full URL of the store.
Official N/A The full URL of the store.
Amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Doom-Collectors-Edition-Pc/dp/B0002IBEJQ B0002IBEJQ
Amazon.co.uk http://www.amazon.co.uk/Doom-Collectors-Edition-PC-CD/dp/B0002ESMG8 B0002ESMG8
Battle.net https://us.battle.net/shop/en/product/starcraft-ii-wings-of-liberty starcraft-ii-wings-of-liberty
Desura http://www.desura.com/games/five-nights-at-freddys five-nights-at-freddys
Direct2Drive https://www.direct2drive.com/#!/download-wolfenstein-the-new-order/5005889 5005889
GamersGate http://www.gamersgate.com/DD-DOOM2/doom-ii DD-DOOM2
GOG.com http://www.gog.com/game/system_shock_2 system_shock_2
GMG (Green Man Gaming) http://www.greenmangaming.com/s/ca/en/pc/games/action/quake-iv/ quake-iv
Humble (Humble Store) https://www.humblebundle.com/store/p/thetalosprinciple_storefront thetalosprinciple
itch.io https://pixeltitans.itch.io/strafe-speed-zone-v2 The full URL of the game page.
MacApp (Mac App Store) https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/rage-campaign-edition/id468808410?mt=12 id468808410
Origin https://www.origin.com/en-ca/store/buy/titanfall/pc-download/base-game/deluxe-edition titanfall
Steam http://store.steampowered.com/app/2310/ 2310
Uplay http://shop.ubi.com/store/ubina/en_CA/pd/productID.277857200 The full URL of the game page.
WinStore (Windows Store) http://apps.microsoft.com/windows/en-us/app/halo-spartan-assault/8fe2d694-baa2-4011-99c0-3a22216223bb 8fe2d694-baa2-4011-99c0-3a22216223bb

DLC table

Template documentation

Syntax (base)

{DLC|
--rows go here--
}}

Syntax (row)

{{DLC/row| Name | Notes | OS }}

Example

Taken from Unreal

Downloadable content (DLC) and expansions

Name Notes
Unreal Mission Pack 1: Return to Na Pali Included with Unreal Gold.
Windows
Unreal Fusion Map Pack Available for free. See Bonus Content.
Windows
Mac OS

A somewhat minor table, the DLC table displays all official expansions/Downloadable content (DLC) for a game (content included with a patch does NOT count). The layout is very similar to the Availability table, but not as complicated.

DLC row breakdown

Section Definition Notes
Name The name of the expansion/DLC. Follow the naming conventions as set below.
Notes Extra information relating to the particular DLC (pricing, bundle inclusion, etc.)
OS The operating systems that the DLC is available on. Possible values are "DOS", "Windows", "Mac OS", "OS X", and "Linux". Separate each OS with a comma (,).
Layout and naming conventions

Due to the countless types of DLC available, a DLC table can quickly become confusing if not formatted properly.

The following conventions should be used for all DLC tables:

Naming

  • Retail expansions (i.e. had a physical release) should have the full name used.
    • Ex. Unreal Mission Pack 1: Return to Na Pali
  • Digital expansions and addons (DLC) should have only have the sub-name used.
    • Ex. Call of Duty: Black Ops II - Revolution becomes Revolution

Layout

  • All entries should be listed from oldest to newest.
  • In the event of multiple expansion/DLC types, this format should be used (the previous rule still applies)
    • Season Pass
    • Pre-order DLC
    • Physical expansions
    • Digital expansions
    • Meta-game DLC (ex. Extra Weapons Slots)
    • New characters (with other content)
    • New weapons
    • Other customization content (not a skin)
    • New characters (no extra content)
    • Character/weapon skins
    • Everything else

Essential improvements

The Essential improvements section hold all information and downloads that are either required or highly recommended. Note that fixes for issues should go in the Issues Fixed section.

Some examples of what to place here:

  • Patches (both official and unofficial)
  • Intro skip methods
  • Major community mods
  • Game-specfic utilities

Game data

The Game data section holds information relating to possibly the two most important types of files available: configuration (or config) files and save data/files.

Config files hold all the customization values needed to run the game, while save files hold the in-game progress made by the player. The locations of both file types are critical for modifying the game and/or backing up progress.

The section also handles information regarding the save game cloud syncing services (services or programs that automatically backup save files to an offsite server).

Main table

Template documentation

Syntax (base)

{{Game data|
--rows go here--
}}

Syntax (row)

{{Game data/row| OS | File location }}

Example

System Location
DOS <path-to-game>
Windows %APPDATA%\Vessel\
Windows %USERPROFILE%\Documents\
Mac OS (Classic) <path-to-game>
macOS (OS X) ~/Library/Application Support/Vessel/
Linux ~/.config/Vessel/
Linux (Proton) <Steam-folder>/steamapps/compatdata/10/pfx/[Note 1]

The main part of the section. Like the Availability and DLC tables, the Game data table can be dynamically adjusted to only show the applicable OSes. Unlike other tables however, it needs to be used twice in an article (one for config files, another for save files). The only times this is not the case is when a game does not use save files (game is multiplayer only or uses a save system that does not rely on files. The save files table can be omitted) or both the config files and save files are in the same folder (use one table for both file types).

General rules

  • In the case that the game has multiple OS versions available, organize the rows in the following order (for all the platforms that apply):
    • DOS
    • Windows
    • Mac OS
    • OS X
    • Linux
  • Use environment variables when possible. The wiki already has special variables to represent them (see Game data).
  • Windows and DOS use \ as the directory separator. OS X and Linux use /. Mac OS uses :.
  • Games with multiple distribution versions on the same OS (ex. Steam, Origin) should have separate rows if files are placed differently.

Popular file locations

A list of common file locations:

Windows
Location Path Notes
Base game folder <path-to-game>\
Game subfolder <path-to-game>\(name of subfolder)\ Look for folders labeled along the lines of "Profiles", "Saves", "Save Games", or "Configs". Sometimes the relevant files can be located with the game binaries (the folder is normally called "Bin").
User's "Saved Games" folder %USERPROFILE%\Saved Games\
User's "Documents" folder %USERPROFILE%\Documents\
"My Games" folder %USERPROFILE%\Documents\My Games\ Some Unreal Engine 3 games are lumped together under the "UnrealEngine3" subfolder.
Local AppData folder %LOCALAPPDATA%\ Hidden folder.
LocalLow AppData folder %USERPROFILE%\AppData\LocalLow\ Hidden folder.
Roaming AppData folder %APPDATA%\ Hidden folder.
VirtualStore folder %LOCALAPPDATA%\VirtualStore\Program Files\
%LOCALAPPDATA%\VirtualStore\Program Files (x86)\
Hidden folder. Files located here are equivalent to the main folder counterparts.

(Ex. %LOCALAPPDATA%\VirtualStore\Program Files (x86)\Diablo II\Save\ is the same as <path-to-game>\Save\)

ProgramData folder %PROGRAMDATA%\ Hidden folder.
HKEY_CURRENT_USER HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\ Configuration values are stored here. The Registry Editor is required to access this path. Files can sometimes be found under the "Wow6432Node" subfolder. Only list this path if no other files can be found elsewhere.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\ Configuration values are stored here. The Registry Editor is required to access this path. Files can sometimes be found under the "Wow6432Node" subfolder. Only list this path if no other files can be found elsewhere.
OS X
Location Path Notes
Application support ~/Library/Application Support/ .
Linux
Location Path Notes
Base game folder <path-to-game>/
Game subfolder <path-to-game>/(name of subfolder)/ Look for folders labeled along the lines of "Profiles", "Saves", "Save Games", or "Configs". Sometimes the relevant files can be located with the game binaries (the folder is normally called "Bin").
XDG_DATA_HOME ~/.local/share/ See also XDG support.
XDG_CONFIG_HOME ~/.config/ See also XDG support.
HOME ~/ Usually the folders are hidden (beginning with a full stop).

XDG support

If the game is available on Linux, support for the XDG Base Directory Specification needs to be mentioned. The tag is always placed under the config files table.

Syntax

{{XDG|true/false}}

Example

<config file table>

This game does not follow the XDG Base Directory Specification on Linux.

<save game data table>

Save game cloud syncing table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Save game cloud syncing
|origin                = 
|origin notes          = 
|square enix           = 
|square enix notes     =
|steam cloud           = true/false/unknown
|steam cloud notes     = 
|uplay                 = 
|uplay notes           = 
|gamesave manager      = 
|gamesave manager notes= 
}}

Example

System Native Notes
Origin
Steam Cloud
Uplay

A minor table, the Save game cloud syncing table displays all cloud syncing services that support the game.

Note that only the stores/services the game is available on need to be filled in. The rest can be left blank. Also, the GameSave Manager field will only show if the value is set to true.

Full Example

Taken from Vessel
Configuration file(s) location
System Location
Windows %APPDATA%\Vessel\
macOS (OS X) ~/Library/Application Support/Vessel/
Linux ~/.config/Vessel/
Linux (Proton) <Steam-folder>/steamapps/compatdata/10/pfx/[Note 1]
This game follows the XDG Base Directory Specification on Linux.
Save game data location
System Location
Windows %APPDATA%\Vessel\
macOS (OS X) ~/Library/Application Support/Vessel/
Linux ~/.local/share/Vessel/
Linux (Proton) <Steam-folder>/steamapps/compatdata/10/pfx/[Note 1]
Save game cloud syncing
System Native Notes
Origin
Steam Cloud

Video Settings

The largest table in an article, the Video Settings section deals with all visual/graphical related features and options available for a game.

The table

Template documentation

Syntax

==Video settings==
{{Video settings
|wsgf link                  = 
|widescreen wsgf award      = gold/silver/limited/unsupported/incomplete
|multimonitor wsgf award    = gold/silver/limited/unsupported/incomplete
|ultrawidescreen wsgf award = gold/silver/limited/unsupported/incomplete
|4k ultra hd wsgf award     = gold/silver/limited/unsupported/incomplete
|widescreen resolution      = unknown
|widescreen resolution notes= 
|multimonitor               = unknown
|multimonitor notes         = 
|ultrawidescreen            = unknown
|ultrawidescreen notes      = 
|4k ultra hd                = unknown
|4k ultra hd notes          = 
|fov                        = unknown
|fov notes                  = 
|windowed                   = unknown
|windowed notes             = 
|borderless windowed        = unknown
|borderless windowed notes  = 
|anisotropic                = unknown
|anisotropic notes          = 
|antialiasing               = unknown
|antialiasing notes         = 
|vsync                      = unknown
|vsync notes                = 
|60 fps                     = unknown
|60 fps notes               = 
|120 fps                    = unknown
|120 fps notes              = 
|color blind                = unknown
|color blind notes          = 
}}

Example

Graphics option Option WSGF Notes
Widescreen resolution
Multi-monitor
Ultra-widescreen
4K Ultra HD
The interface scales with the resolution and at 4K can become almost unusable.
Field of view (FOV)
Between 75° and 90° vertical.
Windowed
Toggle with Alt+ Enter (when using DOSBox).
Borderless fullscreen windowed
See Borderless fullscreen windowed.
Anisotropic filtering (AF)
Anti-aliasing (AA)
Vertical sync (Vsync)
60 FPS
120+ FPS
Game physics broken past 90 FPS.
High dynamic range display (HDR)
Color blind mode
A fan patch is required.

As an added bonus, a Widescreen Gaming Forum (WSGF) game report can be linked directly into the table. This provides a side-by-side comparison on the general feature support ("is it available, officially or not?") versus the quality of the support ("is the game playable with said features?").

For DOS games, set all fields to false except for Windowed mode (native support via DOSBox)

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Widescreen resolution Support for widescreen resolutions (ex. 1280x720) and aspect ratios (i.e. 16:9, 16:10) Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also be found externally via config files. Most modern games will automatically configure the in-game resolution to the desktop resolution of the active monitor. In some cases, the resolution cannot be manually set. Support does not count if the resolution is stretched.
Multi-monitor Support for multiple monitors (i.e. 2 or more) Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also be found externally via config files or utilities. Games with AMD Eyefinity or Nvidia Surround should support this automatically. In some cases the resolution can be too high to be set in-game or will have issues such as the UI not scaling correctly.
Ultra widescreen Support for ultra widescreen resolutions (ex. 2560x1080) and aspect ratios (i.e. 21:9) Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also be found externally via config files. Games with ultra widescreen support automatically have widescreen resolution support. Rather uncommon feature due to the specialized hardware required.
4K Ultra HD Support for 4K resolutions (i.e. 3840x2160) Can be found in the in-game options menu. It can also be found externally via config files. Games with 4K support automatically have widescreen resolution support. Rather uncommon feature due to the specialized hardware required.
Field of view (FOV) The amount of game view that is on display during a game (i.e. field of view) can be adjusted. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. A somewhat uncommon feature. Only applicable to 3D games where the camera can be moved freely. Set the field as N/A for 2D games or games with a fixed view.
Windowed The game can be run in a desktop window. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. In some cases, the game runs by default in a window. A majority of the games available have this feature available. Some games can toggle Windowed mode with Alt+ Enter.
Borderless fullscreen windowed A variation of windowed mode, the game can be run in a borderless desktop window. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. Sometimes found externally via config files. In rare cases, the game runs by default in a borderless window. Uncommon feature found in modern games.
Anisotropic filtering (AF) A filtering method that preserves texture quality over great distances. Can be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. In some cases, the game has some level of Anisotropic filtering enabled by default (ex. Unity-based games). Very common feature found in most most modern games. Reserved for games with 3D movement or camera systems. If a game is 2D-based, leave the field "n/a".
Anti-aliasing (AA) A rendering technique that smooths out the edges of objects (i.e. removes the staircase effect). Can be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. Very common feature under multiple names. Reserved for games with 3D movement or camera systems. If a game is 2D-based, leave the field "n/a".
Vertical sync (Vsync) A rendering option that syncs the monitor refresh rate with the GPU draw rate to prevent screen tearing. Can be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. In some cases, the game runs with Vsync enabled by default. A majority of the games available have this feature available. Only active when a game is fullscreen.
60 FPS Support for frame rates greater than or equal to 60. Disable Vsync for the game (if the option is available) and use a frame rate counter while playing (either built-in to the game or external tools like Bandicam or FRAPS). If needed, reduce all graphics options to the lowest possible settings. Depending on the game, either very easy or hard to determine. Some games have Vsync on permanently and only monitors with high refresh rates will be able to get high FPS values. Also, note any issues with the game that occur while having a high frame rate (ex. animations are locked at 30 FPS, physics are broken beyond 80 FPS, etc.)
120+ FPS Support for frame rates greater than or equal to 120. Disable Vsync for the game (if the option is available) and use a frame rate counter while playing (either built-in to the game or external tools like Bandicam or FRAPS). If needed, reduce all graphics options to the lowest possible settings. Games with 120+ FPS support automatically have 60 FPS support. Depending on the game, either very easy or hard to determine. Some games have Vsync on permanently and only monitors with high refresh rates will be able to get high FPS values. Also, note any issues with the game that occur while having a high frame rate (ex. animations are locked at 30 FPS, physics are broken beyond 80 FPS, etc.)
Color blind mode Support for alternate filters/colour schemes to assist people with colour blindness. Can be found in the in-game options menus. Uncommon feature found in modern games.

Input Settings

The Input Settings section deals with all input related features and options available for a game.

The table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Input settings
|key remap                 = unknown
|key remap notes           = 
|acceleration option       = unknown
|acceleration option notes = 
|mouse menu                = unknown
|mouse menu notes          = 
|invert mouse y-axis       = unknown
|invert mouse y-axis notes = 
|controller support        = unknown
|controller support notes  = 
|full controller           = unknown
|full controller notes     = 
|controller remap          = unknown
|controller remap notes    = 
|invert controller y-axis  = unknown
|invert controller y-axis notes= 
|touchscreen               = unknown
|touchscreen notes         = 
}}

Example

The table holds all the relevant information for the section. It is split up into 3 distinct sub-sections:

  • Keyboard and Mouse
  • Controllers
  • Touchscreen support

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Remapping Ability to reassign or remap keyboard key to other commands/abilities. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also be found externally via config files.
Mouse acceleration Option where the cursor distance increases if the mouse is moved quickly. Also loosely called Mouse smoothing. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. It can also be found externally via config files. In some cases, the option is already on by default. Mouse acceleration is a somewhat complicated setting to determine. See the glossary page for techniques and full definitions. Also, it the game has no mouse support in regular gameplay, leave the field "n/a".
Mouse input in menus Having mouse input (either movement, scroll wheel, or full cursor) in the in-game menus. A mouse cursor should be available in-game and can select menu items. If a cursor is not available, check the scroll wheel for menu selection. If the scroll wheel is not available, check physical mouse movement (normally vertical) for menu selection. List the field "false" only if all 3 input methods fail. Almost all modern games come with this feature built-in. Only certain indie titles and DOS-era games do not have such support.
Mouse Y-axis inversion Vertical (or Y-axis) mouse movement can be inverted (i.e. moving the mouse up will make the in-game camera go down). Can be found in the in-game options menu. It can also be found externally via config files. Reserved for games with 3D movement or camera systems. If a game is 2D-based or does not have mouse support in regular gameplay, leave the field "n/a".
Controller support Support for game controllers, gamepads, and/or joysticks. Normally included either built-in to the game/engine or available as a toggle in-game. Can also be found externally via config files. A toolkit is also available to further narrow down the extent of the support (DirectInput or XInput). Most games include some level of controller support. If this field is set to "false", the other controller related fields are hidden. Leave the other fields "unknown".
Full controller support An extension of the previous field, the ability to navigate all in-game menus with a controller without requiring extra keyboard or mouse input. If the game is available on Steam, it should also support Big Picture mode. Normally built-in to the game/engine. With a controller (preferably XInput-based) navigate through the game and menus. If a menu (excluding keyboard and mouse specific menus) cannot be navigated, leave the field "false". Most modern games that include controller support also have this functionality included. Some games require a toggle to be activated before controller support is enabled. Regardless of level of support, set the field "false" and state that the toggle requires to be activated via keyboard/mouse input.
Controller remapping Ability to reassign or remap controller buttons to other commands/abilities. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also be found externally via config files. If a game has pre-configured layouts instead of full remapping, set the field to "false" and mention the layouts.
Controller Y-axis inversion Vertical (or Y-axis) controller movement can be inverted (ex. moving the right analog stick up will make the in-game camera go down). Can be found in the in-game options menu. It can also be found externally via config files. Reserved for games with 3D movement or camera systems. If a game is 2D-based, leave the field "n/a".
Touchscreen optimised Support for touchscreen monitors. Can be found in the in-game options menu. Sometimes built-in to the game. Very rare feature with desktop-grade games. Common with mobile-based games. The field will only be visible if it is set to either "true" or "hackable".

Audio Settings

The Audio Settings section deals with all audio related features and options available for a game. It also holds the Localization table, which handles all the languages a game is available in and the degree of translation provided.

Main table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Audio settings
|separate volume          = unknown
|separate volume notes    = 
|surround sound           = unknown
|surround sound notes     = 
|subtitles                = unknown
|subtitles notes          = 
|closed captions          = unknown
|closed captions notes    = 
|mute on focus lost       = unknown
|mute on focus lost notes = 
|eax support              = unknown
|eax support notes        = 
}}

Example

Audio options Native Notes
Separate volume controls
Dialogue, Music, Sound Effects
Surround sound
Supports 5.1 and 7.1
Subtitles
All speech is text-based.
Closed captions
Mute on focus lost
EAX support
EAX 2.0

The main part of the section. As mentioned earlier, it holds all audio related features and options available for a game.

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Separate volume controls Separate volume sliders for specific parts of game audio. Can normally be found in the in-game options menus. They can also found externally via config files (rarely it is the only way to access these settings). Toggles do not count.
Surround sound Audio technique involving multiple speakers and audio channels that allows for 360° of audio coverage. Normally included either built-in to the game engine or as an option either in-game or externally. The developer's official website or feature list should state it. Only applicable for 3D games. For 2D titles, leave the field "n/a".
Subtitles Text accompanied with any dialogue in-game. Can be found either as an option in-game or on by default. Applies for games with spoken dialogue. For games with no speech or text-only dialogue, leave the field "n/a".
Closed captions Text accompanied with all audio in-game. Can be found in the in-game options menu. Very rare feature. Applies for games with spoken dialogue. For games with no speech or text-only dialogue, leave the field "n/a".
Mute on focus lost In-game audio is muted when game is not in focus (ex. Using Alt+Tab to switch between running applications). Use Alt+Tab to switch to the desktop. If there is no audio once the switch is complete, mark the field as "true". If there is still audio or it is muffled/quieter, mark the field as "false". In the event Alt+Tab is disabled by the game, mark the field as "false" and state that Alt+Tab is not supported. Some games will have different behavior depending on the focus loss type (window is minimized vs. just unfocused when application is windowed).
EAX support Environmental Audio Extensions (or EAX) is a sound library that allows for enhanced 3D audio effects. Can be found as an option either in-game or externally. The developer's official website, game feature list, or game manual should state it. The library does not provide surround sound support. Also, due to the deprecated status of the interface, this field will only appear if the field is set to "true".

Localizations table

Template documentation

Syntax (base)

{{L10n|content=
--rows go here--
}}

Syntax (row)

{{L10n/switch
 |language  = Language name
 |interface = true/false/unknown
 |audio     = 
 |subtitles = 
 |notes     = 
 |fan       = yes
}}

Example

Localizations

Language UI Audio Sub Notes
English
French
German
Italian
Spanish

The other half of section, the Localizations table displays all the languages a game supports and the extent to which it has been localized. Due to the numerous languages available, the table has been designed to be dynamic. Only the relevant languages are shown.

Some things to note:

  • The table is categorized in alphabetical order (A-Z).
    • The only exception to this is the English row. Unless the game has no English translation, the row always stays at the top of the table.
  • Localization information is rarely kept track of and will make filling in the tables difficult.
    • Currently, the most reliable source of information on this topic is Steam and even then the tables they provide are sometimes not completely accurate.
    • Ultimately, the best sources will be owning the game and playing it, the game credits (localization teams and cast will be mentioned somewhere), and any official announcements on language support.
  • The languages the table support all have at least one game that is localized in that language. If a game is localized in a language that is not supported by the table, contact a mod or admin and it will be added in.

Field breakdown

Field Definition Notes
Language The name of the language.
Interface The game interface is localized to this language. If a game supports a language, at the absolute minimum this field must be set to "true".
Audio The spoken audio for the game is localized to this language. In some cases, English may be the only language it has been localized into. If a game has no speech, gibberish for speech (single word remarks fall into this category), or all text-based speech, set the field to "n/a".
Subtitles The subtitles and/or Closed captions for the game are localized to this language More common to find than spoken audio localizations. If a game has no speech, gibberish for speech (single word remarks fall into this category), or all text-based speech, set the field to "n/a".
Notes Extra information relating to the particular language (available only in region-specific versions, unique quirks and issues, etc.)
Fan An unofficial/fan translation of this particular language is available. Leave the field blank unless a fan translation is available. To be used in conjunction with the "Fan notes" field. Only valid value is "yes".
Fan notes Information relating to the particular fan translation (download link, unique quirks and issues, etc.) For fan translations, use this field instead of "Notes". If left blank, the table will provide a basic note (see the table example). The "Fan" field must be set to "yes" to be viewed.

Network

The Network section holds all the multiplayer and networking options available for a game. A list of game-specific network ports required to port forward a game is also provided.

The section is split up into 3 distinct tables:

Multiplayer Types table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Network/Multiplayer
|local play           = 
|local play players   = 
|local play modes     = 
|local play notes     = 
|lan play             = 
|lan play players     = 
|lan play modes       = 
|lan play notes       = 
|online play          = 
|online play players  = 
|online play modes    = 
|online play notes    = 
|asynchronous         = 
|asynchronous notes   = 
}}

Example

Multiplayer types

Type Native Players Notes
Local play
10 Co-op, Hot seat, Versus
Use <mod name here>.
LAN play
Online play
64 Co-op, Versus
Co-op limited to 4 players.
Asynchronous multiplayer

The first table of the section, it handles all the multiplayer gameplay types available.

Almost all of the fields are split up into three major categories:

  • Local: The game's multiplayer can be played on a single system.
  • LAN: The game's multiplayer can be played on a Local Area Network (or LAN).
  • Online: The game's multiplayer can be played on the Internet with other users.

Each category has a "Modes" row to state the gameplay types that particular networking method supports. There are three possible values:

  • Co-op: Cooperative mode (i.e. players work together, player vs. environment. Also called PvE).
  • Hot-seat: Multiplayer can be played with a single keyboard/mouse combo or controller. Also known as "Pass-and-Play".
  • Versus: Normal multiplayer (i.e. head to head, player vs. player. Also called PvP).

Finally, there is a section for Asynchronous multiplayer support:

  • Asynchronous: Multiplayer is turn-based (i.e. gameplay is not in real-time).

General rules

  • Fill in only the fields that apply to the game.
    • If a game has either LAN or Online support, both the LAN and Online rows need to be filled in for that particular gameplay type.
      • Ex. If the game has support for online coop, fill in the the LAN and Online rows while mentioning "Co-op" in their respective Modes rows.
    • If a game only has Local support, the LAN and Online rows will be set to "false".
  • The Players field for each row displays the maximum amount of players that particular network setup can support.
    • Do not provide range values (i.e. 1-32).
    • Some games require dedicated servers to hit the true max player count.
      • Ex. Creating a multiplayer game in-game will allow the max player count to be only 16, while a dedicated server run externally can support up to 64.
  • If a gameplay type is restricted to a specific mode (ex. LAN Coop can only be played on Horde Mode), provide the name of the mode in the notes field.
Where to find the information

While most of this information is highlighted by the developer or publisher, smaller details (such as max player count) may be overlooked.

There are multiple places where information on multiplayer types and modes can be found, either partially or completely:

  • In-game
  • Retail game box
  • Game manual
  • Official README file
  • Digital store game page
  • Official game website
  • Developer/publisher support pages
  • MobyGames

Connection types table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Network/Connections
|matchmaking        = unknown
|matchmaking notes  = 
|p2p                = unknown
|p2p notes          = 
|dedicated          = unknown
|dedicated notes    = 
|self-hosting       = unknown
|self-hosting notes = 
|direct ip          = unknown
|direct ip notes    = 
}}

Example

Connection types

Type Native Notes
Matchmaking
Peer-to-peer
Dedicated
Self-hosting
Direct IP
Open the console (~) and use connect followed by the IP and port.

The second table of the section, it handles all the network options available for a game.

Note that this table only needs to be added in for games with LAN or online multiplayer types.

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Matchmaking Automatic server and/or game lobby search functionality. Searches are sometimes based on player skill level and other factors. In the multiplayer menus, check for a option along the lines of "Quick match" or "Find match". Some games may have matchmaking as the only way to find games.
Peer-to-peer Multiplayer games are created by connecting players together and using their devices to send and receive data between each other. When creating a new multiplayer game in-game, check for an option along the lines of "Dedicated" or "Dedicated Server". If a game does not come with dedicated server support, set the field to "true". If it does come with dedicated server support and games must be created as dedicated servers, set the field to "false".
Dedicated Official game server software and/or developer-hosted servers for multiplayer are provided. When creating a new multiplayer game in-game, check for an option along the lines of "Dedicated" or "Dedicated Server". Alternatively, check the developer site, game documents, or official forums for information regarding dedicated server software. If the game is an MMO, set the field to "true". Also, if a guide on how to set up a dedicated server is available, provide a link to it in the Notes.
Self-hosting Servers can be created and hosted by any player who wishes to do so. Check the menus for a "Create game" option. Also check the developer's site and forums for details on any restrictions.
Direct IP Players can connect directly to a server or computer by entering its IP address. Check the multiplayer menus for an option along the lines of "Direct Connect", "Connect with IP", "Connect to...", or "Direct IP connect". Alternatively, check the in-game console for a command that provides this functionality (usually defined as "connect", check the documentation as it might be named something else). Games with dedicated server support normally support this feature.

Ports table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Network/Ports
|tcp  = 
|udp  = 
|upnp = 
}}

Example

Ports

Protocol Port(s) and/or port range(s)
TCP 53, 80, 443, 3074, 7777-9896
UDP 53, 88, 3074
This game supports Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) for automatic port configuration.

The third and final table for the section, it provides the list of ports (both TCP and UDP) required to port forward a game. UPnP support is also shown.

Note that this table only needs to be added in for games with online multiplayer types.

General rules

  • Ports are ordered from lowest to highest, separating each new port with ,
  • Only provide outbound ports specific to the game itself. Do not include inbound ports or digital store client ports (Steam, Origin, etc.)
  • If UPnP support for the game is not known, leave the field blank.
Where to find the information

There are multiple places where information on game network ports can be found, either partially or completely:

  • In-game (check for dedicated multiplayer menus)
  • Game manual (rare)
  • Official README file
  • Developer/publisher support pages
  • Internet forums
  • PortForward.com (the most comprehensive source of this type of information)

VR support

Only add in this section if any of the table fields apply.

The VR support section handles all 3D and VR-related software and hardware support for a game

The table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{VR support
|gg3d name                   = 
|native 3d gg3d award        = platinum/gold/silver/bronze/uncertified
|nvidia 3d vision gg3d award = 
|tridef 3d gg3d award        = 
|iz3d gg3d award             = 
|native 3d                   = 
|native 3d notes             = 
|nvidia 3d vision            = 
|nvidia 3d vision notes      = 
|tridef 3d                   = 
|tridef 3d notes             = 
|iz3d                        = 
|iz3d notes                  = 
|3rd space gaming vest       = 
|3rd space gaming vest notes = 
|creative senz3d             = 
|creative senz3d notes       = 
|leap motion controller      = 
|leap motion controller notes= 
|novint falcon               = 
|novint falcon notes         = 
|oculus rift                 = 
|oculus rift notes           = 
|razer hydra                 = 
|razer hydra notes           = 
|trackir                     = 
|trackir notes               = 
}}

Example

The table holds all the relevant information for the section. It is split up into 2 distinct sub-sections:

  • 3D modes
  • Devices

General rules

  • Fill in all the fields for 3D modes, but only fill in the applicable fields for Devices.
  • GameGrade3D (GG3D) is a database focused on assessing the quality of stereoscopic 3D modes used in games.
    • The community-driven aspect of grading may make it difficult to pinpoint the award level for the respective field. As such, the award level with the most submissions is the overall award level for the mode (ignore sub-ratings).
      • Ex. If a entry has 3 Platinum awards but also 6 Gold awards, set the relevant award field to gold

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Native 3D Support for native stereoscopic visuals (i.e. independent implementation not reliant on 3rd party software). The developers will state either on the store page or elsewhere support for the mode. Sometimes support is already included with certain game engines.
NVIDIA 3D Vision Support for NVIDIA 3D Vision, a complete stereoscopic gaming kit. The developers or Nvidia will state either on the store page or elsewhere support for the mode. A full list of officially supported games can be found on Nvidia's website.
TriDef 3D Support for TriDef 3D, an application that enables stereoscopic visuals for 2D-only games and media. A full list of officially supported games can be found on TriDef 3D's website.
iZ3D Support for iZ3D, an application that enables stereoscopic visuals. A full list of officially supported games can be found on iZ3D's website (archived). The developers of iZ3D went bankrupt in mid-2012. As such, the software is no longer actively supported and is considered obsolete.
3RD Space Gaming Vest Support for the 3RD Space Gaming Vest. A full list of officially supported games can be found on TN Games's website.
Creative Senz3D Support for the Creative Senz3D, a gaming-centric Time-of-flight (ToF) web camera. All supported games can be found on the offical app store.
Leap Motion Controller Support for the Leap Motion Controller, a sensor-based controller. All supported games can be found on the offical app store.
Novint Falcon Support for the Novint Falcon, a haptics-centric controller. A full list of officially supported games can be found on Novint's website.
Oculus Rift Support for the Oculus Rift, a virtual reality (VR) headset. The developers will state either on the store page or elsewhere support for the headset. Very rare feature. Support should be expected to become more prevalent once a consumer version of the device is made available.
Razer Hydra Support for the Razer Hydra, a motion and orientation-focused controller. A list of officially supported games can be found on Wikipedia. Previously known as Sixense TrueMotion. No longer sold or supported by Razer.
TrackIR Support for the TrackIR, an optical motion tracking controller. A full list of officially supported games can be found on NaturalPoint's website.

Issues Unresolved

The Issues Unresolved section hold all issues with a game that have no known fix or partial fixes that do not completely patch the problem. It acts as a sister section to Issues Fixed.

All guidelines that apply to to the Issues Fixed section apply here as well. The only difference is that if a full solution is found for an issue, the sub-section related to the problem should be moved to the Issues Fixed section and expanded upon.

Issues Fixed

Reading the Fixboxes and providing instructions section is recommended before adding to this section

The main reason this wiki exists, the Issues Fixed section holds all the issues with a game that have a known fix or workaround.

Note that if a issue is fixed with an official patch, the related fix can be removed from the page.

Layout

The following layout should be followed for games with multiple issues:

  • Game launch issues (crashes at launch, fails to launch, etc.)
  • Game-breaking issues (broken game mechanics, fundamental DRM-related problems, etc.)
  • Major issues (crashes, errors, etc.)
  • Graphical issues (missing textures, broken models, etc.)
  • Everything else

Other Information

The Other Information section hold all information and downloads that are not critically essential, but useful all the same. It acts as a sister section to Essential improvements.

The API and Middleware tables also reside here. Note that both tables are always placed at the top of the section.

General

All guidelines that apply to to the Essential improvements section apply here as well.

Some examples of what would be placed in this section:

  • General console commands list
  • Steps to add alternate OS support
  • WINE setup tips
  • Cosmetic/enhanced visuals mods
  • Downgrading the game
  • Anything that would not fit in either the Essential improvements or Issues Fixed sections

API table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{API
|direct3d versions      = 
|direct3d notes         = 
|directdraw versions    = 
|directdraw notes       = 
|opengl versions        = 
|opengl notes           = 
|glide versions         = 
|glide notes            = 
|software mode          = 
|software mode notes    = 
|mantle support         = 
|mantle support notes   = 
|dos modes              = 
|dos modes notes        = 
|shader model versions  = 
|shader model notes     = 
|64-bit executable      = 
|64-bit executable notes= 
}}

Example

Technical specs Supported Notes
Direct3D 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
DirectDraw 7
OpenGL 2.0, 4.4 OS X and Linux only.
Glide 2.4, 3
Software renderer
Mantle support
DOS video modes CGA, VGA, SVGA
Shader Model support 1.1, 3, 5
64-bit executable
OS X and Linux only.

The first major table of the section, the API table tracks all the graphics APIs and rendering modes available for a game.

General rules

  • Fill in the relevant fields only. Leave the rest blank.

Field breakdown

Field Definition How to find Notes
Direct3D versions The versions of Direct3D the game can be rendered in. Check the minimum systems requirements for the game. The DirectX version required is what the game is using. Alternatively, some games have multiple renderers available and can be toggled in the video settings. Finally, some screen recording tools (like Bandicam) have an API indicator, stating the exact version currently being used. Also called D3D. Can only be found in Windows-based games. Newer versions of the API are restricted to newer versions of Windows (Direct3D 10 requires Vista or newer).
DirectDraw versions The versions of DirectDraw the game can be rendered in. Check the minimum systems requirements for the game. The DirectX version required is what the game is using. Alternatively, some games have multiple renderers available and can be toggled in the video settings. Finally, some screen recording tools (like Bandicam) have an API indicator, stating if the API is being used in general. Also called DDraw. DirectDraw was deprecated in DirectX 8, making it a legacy API. The latest version available is 7. Very rare to find any modern game still using the API. Can only be found in Windows-based games.
OpenGL versions The versions of OpenGL the game can be rendered in. Check the minimum systems requirements for the game. Sometimes the OpenGL version required is stated. If not, checking the latest OpenGL version supported by the GPU required can give an accurate ballpark figure. Alternatively, some games have multiple renderers available and can be toggled in the video settings. Finally, some screen recording tools (like Bandicam) have an API indicator, stating if the API is being used in general. Harder to determine compared to the other APIs. Mainly found in Mac OS, OS X, and Linux games, but can sometimes be found on Windows.
Glide versions The versions of Glide the game can be rendered in. Check the minimum systems requirements for the game. Sometimes the Glide version required is stated. If not, checking the game installation folder for the DLL file can give the major version used (glide.dll=Glide 2.1, glide2x.dll=Glide 2.4, and glide3x.dll=Glide 3.0). Alternatively, some games have multiple renderers available and can be toggled in the video settings. Legacy API only found in early 3D games (1996-early 2000s). The latest version available is 3.10.00.30303. Some games refuse to run or provide higher quality visuals without a Glide-enabled GPU. Use a Glide wrapper like nGlide to bypass these restrictions.
Software mode The game has a software renderer available (i.e. 3D rendering is all handled by the CPU, instead of the GPU). Check the video settings for a renderer toggle or option along the lines of "hardware acceleration", "hardware rendering", or "Software mode". Usually found in early 3D games (1996-early 2000s). If the software mode uses another API (ex. DirectDraw), make note of it in the respective fields. Being able to toggle between software and hardware-rendered cursors does not count. Leave the field blank if a software mode is not available.
Mantle support The game supports the Mantle API. Check the video settings for a renderer toggle. The developer's official website, game feature list, or game manual may also state it. New API currently in beta, making support very limited. Only available for AMD GPUs. Leave the field blank if Mantle support is not available.
DOS modes The display modes available for a game. Check the systems requirements for the game. Can also be found on the retail box. Only for games with a DOS release or version. Some display modes may be exclusive to certain releases.
Shader model versions The versions of the High-level shader language the game supports. Check the systems requirements for the game. The DirectX version required can determine the Shader model used (see DirectX and associated Shader model versions). Also called the High-level shading language (HLSL) or Shader model. Only for games using Direct3D 8 or newer. Most games use just one version, but some have support for multiple.
64-bit executable A 64-bit executable (or binary) is available. Check the systems requirements for the game. Sometimes a 64-bit OS is required. Alternatively, running the game on a 64-bit system and checking the game process in the Task Manager is a reliable method (32-bit applications will have a tag next to their process, 64-bit apps will not). 64-bit applications started appearing around the mid-2000s, but did not become more commonplace until a few years ago. Most modern AAA releases require 64-bit OSes. The field is not applicable for DOS-based games.
DirectX OpenGL equivalents

For games using both DirectX and OpenGL, it may be difficult to determine what version of OpenGL the game is using. The developer may not provide a specific version.

That being said, knowing just the DirectX version used can give a rough estimate on the equivalent OpenGL version.

DirectX version Equivalent OpenGL version
9.0x 2.x
10.x 3.x
11.x 4.x
DirectX and associated Shader model versions

For 3D games using DirectX, the Shader model field must be filled in. However, the Shader model version used may not be provided by the developer.

Unless otherwise specified, the associated Shader model version is what that version of DirectX is using.

DirectX version Associated Shader model version
8.0 1.0 and 1.1
8.0a 1.3
8.1 1.4
9.0 2.0
9.0a 2.0a
9.0b 2.0b
9.0c 3.0
10.0 4.0
10.1 4.1
11.x 5.0

Middleware table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{Middleware
|physics          = 
|physics notes    = 
|audio            = 
|audio notes      = 
|interface        = 
|interface notes  = 
|input            = 
|input notes      = 
|cutscenes        = 
|cutscenes notes  = 
|multiplayer      = 
|multiplayer notes= 
}}

Example

Middleware Notes
Physics PhysX Lacks GPU acceleration on Linux.
Audio FMOD
Interface Scaleform
Input Object Oriented Input System (OIS)
Cutscenes Bink Video
Multiplayer Punkbuster, Steamworks

The second major table of the section, the Middleware table lists all the known 3rd party middleware (i.e. not a proprietary in-house solution, integrated as part of the game engine or as part of a graphics API) included with the game.

There are six major types of middleware relevant to the wiki that are tracked:

Middleware type Definition Examples
Physics Middleware that simulates physics against objects in-game. Bullet Physics Engine, Havok, PhysX
Audio Middleware that provides support for audio playback. FMOD, Miles Sound System, Wwise
Interface Middleware that assists with rendering or the design of in-game user interfaces. Flash, FreeType 2, Scaleform
Input Middleware that provides support for or assists with input systems/controls (keyboard, mouse, gamepads, etc.) Object Oriented Input System (OIS)
Cutscenes Middleware that provides cutscene or pre-recorded video playback support. Bink Video, Smacker
Multiplayer Middleware that provides the base of multiplayer support or assists with some other aspect relating to it (anti-cheat, matchmaking, etc.) GameSpy, PunkBuster, Steamworks
Known middleware DLL files

One method of detecting what middleware a game uses is looking through its files for specific DLL files.

This is a list of all the DLL files associated with middleware:

Physics
DLL file Associated middleware
PhysX*.dll PhysX
Newton.dll Newton Dynamics
ode.dll Open Dynamics Engine
Audio
DLL file Associated middleware
mss32.dll Miles Sound System
bass.dll, bass*.dll BASS
fmod.dll, fmodex.dll FMOD
irrKlang.dll irrKlang
OpenAL32.dll OpenAL
Interface
DLL file Associated middleware
CEGUI*.dll Crazy Eddie's GUI System (CEGUI)
Input
DLL file Associated middleware
OIS.dll Object Oriented Input System (OIS)
Cutscenes
DLL file Associated middleware
binkw32.dll Bink Video
Smackw32.dll Smacker
SwiffPlayer.dll Swiff Player
Multiplayer
DLL file Associated middleware
CommunityExpress.dll, CommunityExpressSW.dll Community Express SDK
pb*.dll PunkBuster

System Requirements

The final major section of an article is System Requirements. It holds all the official specifications given by the developer on what is required at the minimum to both run the game at a basic level and run it with all graphical settings maxed out at a playable frame rate.

The table

Template documentation

Syntax

{{System requirements
|OSfamily = 

|minOS    = 
|minCPU   = 
|minCPU2  = 
|minRAM   = 
|minHD    = 
|minGPU   = 
|minGPU2  = 
|minGPU3  = 
|minVRAM  = 
|minOGL   = 
|minDX    = 
|minSM    = 
|minaudio = 
|mincont  = 
|minother = 

|recOS    = 
|recCPU   = 
|recCPU2  = 
|recRAM   = 
|recHD    = 
|recGPU   = 
|recGPU2  = 
|recGPU3  = 
|recVRAM  = 
|recOGL   = 
|recDX    = 
|recSM    = 
|recaudio = 
|reccont  = 
|recother = 
}}

Example

Windows
Minimum Recommended
Operating system (OS) XP
Processor (CPU) AMD Phenom II X4 940 3.0 GHz
Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz
System memory (RAM) 512 MB
Hard disk drive (HDD) 150 MB
Video card (GPU) AMD Radeon HD 5770
Nvidia GeForce GTX 460
Intel HD 4000
256 MB of VRAM
OpenGL 3.0 compatible
DirectX 7.0 compatible
Shader model 1.1 support
Sound (audio device) DirectX compatible
Controller Xbox 360 Controller
Other Anything that does not fit elsewhere

The section covers 5 main operating system (OS) families:

  • DOS
  • Windows
  • Mac OS
  • OS X
  • Linux

Within each table, the fields are separated into two distinct sections: minimum requirements (min) and recommended requirements (rec)

Field breakdown

  • OS: Operating Systems supported
  • CPU: Central Processing Unit required. Can list up to 2 CPUs (|CPU = and |CPU2 =)
  • RAM: Random Access Memory required
  • HD: Hard Drive space required
  • GPU: Graphics Processing Unit required. Can list up to 3 GPUs (|GPU =, |GPU2 =, and |GPU3 =)
  • VRAM: Video RAM required
  • OGL: OpenGL version required
  • DX: DirectX version required
  • SM: Shader Model support required
  • audio: Audio device required
  • cont: Controllers supported
  • other: For any other details that do not fit in the other fields
Where to find the information

There are multiple places where the system requirements can be found, either partially or completely:

  • Retail game box
  • Game manual
  • Official README file
  • Digital store game page
  • Official game website
  • Developer/publisher support pages
  • MobyGames

General guidelines

The following guidelines apply for all OSes:

  • Each OS family gets 1 table only.
  • The |*audio =, |*cont =, and |*other = fields are rarely used, if ever. They can be omitted from regular use.
  • When stating OSes, do not include the OS family name. This is already handled by the table title.
    • Ex. If a game supports Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows 7, write down 98, XP, and 7 in the fields.
  • If a game supports multiple versions of an OS family, separate each version with a "," .
  • The |minOS = field should normally have only one entry. All other supported versions of the OS family should be placed in the |recOS = field
  • Correct styling of important companies and product lines:
    • Companies
      • 3dfx
      • AMD
      • ATI
      • Intel
      • Motorola
      • Nvidia
    • Product lines
      • 68000 (can also be shortened to 68k)
      • Athlon
      • Core 2 Duo
      • Core i3, i5, i7
      • Duron
      • GeForce
      • Iris
      • K6
      • Pentium (use Roman Numerals for 2, 3, and 4)
      • Phenom (use Roman Numerals for 2)
      • PowerPC
      • Radeon
      • Radeon X****
      • Voodoo
  • Know when to use AMD and ATI for video cards! ATI is for all cards up to and including the Radeon HD 5000 Series (released on September 10, 2009). AMD is used for all cards part of or newer than the Radeon HD 6000 Series (released on October 22, 2010).
  • All CPUs and GPUs will be named out in full.
    • Ex. Intel Pentium II, ATI Radeon 9800
  • Keep the order of CPUs and GPUs consistent
    • Ex. If Intel is listed first for |minCPU =, it should also be listed first for |recCPU =
  • For older AMD CPUs, they will sometimes state their frequency in terms of " ****+ " (with * being a number). This is an acceptable alternative to specific frequency values.
    • Ex. AMD Athlon 64 3800+
  • If a specific frequency cannot be found, listing just the CPU name is fine.
  • Format to use when writing CPUs:
    • General CPUs (i.e. no specified brand): <frequency> <CPU type>
    • Specific CPU (i.e. specific Intel or AMD processor): <CPU name> <frequency>
  • The |*GPU* = fields are meant to hold specific GPU names only. Do not use statements like "DirectX compatible".

OS specific guidelines

While the template is the same throughout, each OS needs to be handled differently.

DOS
  • For compatibility and accuracy, DOS in the context of the wiki refers to MS-DOS.
  • The final (standalone) release of DOS is 6.22. If a specific recommended OS version cannot be found, use this for the |recOS = field.
  • DOS has no support for graphics APIs like DirectX or OpenGL, making their respective fields irrelevant. They can be omitted from the table.
  • DOS-era games were made when hardware acceleration with dedicated graphics cards had yet to be created. As such, they would not state any video cards to use (sound cards do not count). As an alternative to specific GPU names, list the various video resolutions the game supports (ex. CGA, EGA, VGA, SVGA, etc.)
    • Do not list the video resolutions with multiple |*GPU* = fields. Keep it contained to the same field, while separating each entry with a ","
    • The video resolutions should be sorted from lowest to highest. The Wikipedia page on display resolutions provides official specifications on all the major ones.
    • The |recGPU = field should only have one entry (the highest resolution supported).
Windows
  • Although the early Windows versions (3.1 and earlier) are their own OS, a game can only be listed as part of the Windows family if it cannot run on DOS.
  • In some cases, a re-release of an older title for a newer OS will provide a new set of system requirements. If possible, use the original system requirements.
Mac OS
  • Mac OS is NOT the same as OS X! Mac OS refers to the OS line formally used by Apple starting with System 1 (1984) and ending with Mac OS 9 (1999).
  • The final release of Mac OS is 9.2.2. If a specific recommended OS version cannot be found, use this for the |recOS = field.
  • Mac OS does not have support for DirectX, making its respective fields irrelevant. They can be omitted from the table.
  • There are two "eras" for the Mac OS architecture: 68000 (System 1 to Mac OS 7) and PowerPC (Mac OS 7 and newer).
    • All PowerPC compatible versions of the OS family include a 68k emulator, making compatibility issues non-existent. If a recommended CPU cannot be found for a 68k-based game, use "PowerPC" for the field.
  • Overall performance for Mac OS games were mainly determined by the CPU. For the |*GPU = fields, state the monitor type (black & white or colour) or the colour depth (ex. 256 colour) needed.
OS X
  • OS X is NOT the same as Mac OS! OS X refers to the current OS line used by Apple starting with Mac OS X v10.0 (2000).
  • OS X does not have support for DirectX, making its respective fields irrelevant. They can be omitted from the table.
  • There are two "eras" for the OS X architecture: PowerPC (Mac OS X v10.0 to Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard) and Intel (Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard and newer). Many early OS X titles require a PowerPC-based machine or the Rosetta software to work (Mac OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard is the last version of the OS to use the software). If the game has no Intel port, note the PowerPC reliance in Key points.
    • Also, if the game has both a PowerPC and a separate Intel version available, use the system requirements from the Intel release. It is assumed that all OS X users will run the game on a Intel-based machine.
    • Finally, if the game is PowerPC-based only and a recommended OS version cannot be found, use "10.6".
Linux
  • The Linux family comprises of numerous distributions which all use some form of the Linux kernel. Because of this, it is impossible to state every supported distribution available. There are 3 main ways of stating the supported OS versions:
    1. Use "Any distribution" in |minOS = as a catch-all if a specific distribution is not stated.
    2. If a specific distribution is stated, use that.
    3. If known, the Linux kernel versions can also be used.
  • Linux does not have support for DirectX, making its respective fields irrelevant. They can be omitted from the table.
  • In most cases, the system requirements for the Windows version (if available) can be mirrored with Linux.

References tag

Syntax

{{References}}

Example (See bottom of guide)

The References tag is the very last element placed in a article. It displays a list of all references used throughout the page.

Details on how to properly reference can be found in the Referencing section.

The only rule regarding the tag itself is that it should only be added to an article if there is at least one reference used. Otherwise, it can be omitted.

Conclusion and Examples

Hopefully new and veteran editors alike will find this guide useful for their future contributions. Being an editor should be easy and rewarding, not a tedious exercise.

Of course, individual wiki elements are useless on their own. Here are some examples throughout the wiki of the absolute best that can be offered when all of the above gets put together:

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 File/folder structure within this directory reflects the path(s) listed for Windows and/or Steam game data (use Wine regedit to access Windows registry paths). Games with Steam Cloud support may store data in ~/.steam/steam/userdata/<user-id>/10/ in addition to or instead of this directory. The app ID (10) may differ in some cases. Treat backslashes as forward slashes. See the glossary page for details.

References